Grade 10 Work Experience Programme – Can our Grade 10 students join your workplace for a week?

The goal of the Work Experience Programme is for students to develop a better understanding of the links between school and the skills students will need in their working life. This Work Experience will also give students a chance to meet working professionals to inquire about the daily tasks, responsibilities, working day structure, qualifications needed and to learn more about how they arrived at where they are today in their profession. We feel confident that students will enhance not only their communications and leadership skills, they will learn more about their own strengths and interests throughout this process. Work experience may also help students navigate future university and career decisions.
 
This year’s Work Experience Programme will take place June 3 – 7, the final full week of school. Work Experience is compulsory for all Grade 10 students and will function as the cumulation of their MYP learning journey. We are currently working towards developing a database of workplace options, however, if requested and approved, students can arrange their own work experience placement.
 
Please consider registering to host two or more students in June by completing this FORM by 3 May. We are reaching out to the UNIS Hanoi Community for your help in creating meaningful work experience placements.  Even if your workplace is not a match for students this year, we would still appreciate adding your company or organisation to our database of placement options for future years. We want to expand the options for our students as this programme grows.
 
Your support is VERY much appreciated!

Grade 10 Work Experience Program – Can our Grade 10 students join your workplace for a week?

The goal of the Work Experience Programme is for students to develop a better understanding of the links between school and the skills students will need in their working life. This Work Experience will also give students a chance to meet working professionals to inquire about the daily tasks, responsibilities, working day structure, qualifications needed and to learn more about how they arrived at where they are today in their profession. We feel confident that students will enhance not only their communications and leadership skills, they will learn more about their own strengths and interests throughout this process. Work experience may also help students navigate future university and career decisions.
 
This year’s Work Experience Programme will take place June 3 – 7, the final full week of school. Work Experience is compulsory for all Grade 10 students and will function as the cumulation of their MYP learning journey. We are currently working towards developing a database of workplace options, however, if requested and approved, students can arrange their own work experience placement.
 
Please consider registering to host two or more students in June by completing this FORM by 3 May. We are reaching out to the UNIS Hanoi Community for your help in creating meaningful work experience placements.  Even if your workplace is not a match for students this year, we would still appreciate adding your company or organisation to our database of placement options for future years. We want to expand the options for our students as this programme grows.
 
Your support is VERY much appreciated!

#SustainableUNISHanoi

What’s happening?

Do you know that UNIS Hanoi has community gardens across three school divisions? Do you know that the vegetables grow in our gardens are 100% organic?

What are we doing about it? 

Have you ever asked yourself what it takes to bring vegetables and grains to your dining table?

UNIS Hanoi, Sustainable UNIS Hanoi, Sustainability Committee, Green UNIS Hanoi

A group of HS students has devoted 3 hours per week to learn about sustainable gardening. The students started this project from the beginning of the school year as part of their Service learning activity. By cultivating this piece of land from scratch, the group has learnt that gardening and organic gardening, in particular, is an ongoing process and requires huge efforts to make it happen.

Even though it is truly rewarding to see the plants sprout and grow, there are a lot of work needs to be done on a regular basis including turning the dirt, sowing, watering and weeding until the harvest days.

What can YOU do to help?

Appreciate the food that you eat every day.

Reduce food waste.

#SustainableUNISHanoi

The Solution for Plastic Ocean Problem? – Expert Visit at UNIS Hanoi

Dr Sandra Whitehouse is a Doctor of Philosophy, a Marine Biologist and a senior policy advisor with Ocean Conservancy. While she was here in Vietnam talking to different Government bodies about ocean plastics and marine debris, both in the oceans and river systems, she found time to visit with a group of grade five and six UNIS Hanoi students.

Dr Whitehouse made it clear that the problem of plastic entering the world’s oceans is something that can be fixed in 10 to 15 years. She also explained that the issues of plastic and other debris aren’t simple ones. For example, she is often asked why people don’t get rid of plastic water bottles and go back to glass bottles. “The simple answer, in most cases, is the cost of the ‘carbon footprint’ on the climate and a more comprehensive solution to the problems are recycling and reusing.

Dr Whitehouse explained that Ocean Conservancy and corporate companies are actively looking for ways to reduce waste that is environmentally damaging, through an initiative called the ‘Trash Free Seas Alliance’. Working closely with large corporate companies such as Coca Cola, DOW, WWF, Walmart and AMCOR, to name a few, to bring about change in production and strengthen their responsibility for product disposal, is a high priority.

Another subject in Dr Whitehouse’s presentation was Government spending. The amount of money spent by Governments to support waste management systems is minute compared to money spent on other areas such as schools, water and sanitation, and infrastructure.  

Students had the opportunity to ask Dr Whitehouse questions.

Where is all this plastic coming from?

There are two major sources of ocean plastic. 20 percent is actually still coming from sea-based human activities, direct dumping of plastic in garbage off of boats, fishing gear that’s either been lost or improperly discarded, or from containers spilled into the ocean. But what we also know is that 80 percent of plastic is originating from the land from human activities there, and, in that case, it’s from a number of different sources. We now know that the 50 percent of the leakage of plastic into the ocean is currently coming from five rapidly developing countries in Asia and Southeast Asia, and those are China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka.

According to Dr Whitehouse, about 66 percent of wildlife is impacted by marine debris either by damaging digestive tracts, poisoning, or entanglement, and about 8 million metric tons of plastic is getting into the ocean every day; 80 percent coming from land-based activities. Much of the problem is caused by direct dumping due to the lack of waste facilities. So while some countries are producing more plastic, 99 percent ends up in landfills, whereas developing countries such as Indonesia and China don’t have the proper facilities and necessary management.

What is the solution?

“There isn’t one single solution,” Dr Whitehouse said, explaining that there’s a process and some countries struggle with one specific aspect or another, whether that’s collecting the trash or providing a landfill for dumping. “They’ll need to be tailored for each country.” Dr Whitehouse explained that the Ocean Conservancy is working to solve plastic production and disposal issues from the home, to waste management systems such as landfills.

Dr Whitehouse reminded students that part of solving this worldwide problem was in their hands too. By continuing to be well informed about these issues, spreading awareness and educating others. “You are our future and without you, we don’t have a chance to fix these problems”.